August 23, 2022

How To Be More Positive In Everyday Life

by Psych Times Staff

Most likely, you’ve heard advice to “simply be positive” or “look on the bright side” from someone. And even if they may have the best of intentions, as anyone who has ever been caught off guard by a breakup, cared for a sick family member, or been fired from a job can attest, that’s sometimes an easier said than done situation. 

The truth is that being optimistic may have less to do with always remaining upbeat and more to do with responding in a resilient (not to mention realistic) manner. The best way to describe being positive is to have faith in one’s ability to go through difficult times and to keep in mind that life is not always bad. Life can be hard and things do happen so managing them well will be a benefit to you, it could be through self care, yoga, spending time with family or even CBD from Daniel Fung

Choose a personal slogan and repeat it to help you stay optimistic and confident

One tip is to speak to yourself as you would your best friend since we are frequently harder on ourselves than we would ever be on anybody else. Yes, it may seem unusual at first, but studies have shown that talking to oneself can affect your thoughts, feelings, and behaviour. This is particularly true if you speak to yourself in the second or third person and say things like “You can get through this.”

Then attempt to get knowledge from your negative thoughts

Have you ever become mired in stress and anxiety? Maybe you overthink everything a lot? Or perhaps your stomach is still in knots from that mediocre job presentation you gave last month. Rumination is a process in which we repeatedly review or analyse an upsetting incident from the past or consider the likelihood of unpleasant circumstances in the future.

Be kind to oneself when difficult things do occur

Sadly, there is one thing we can say with certainty: There will inevitably be hiccups along the way. When you do, Eckler advises forgiving yourself and allowing yourself to experience your feelings, whatever they may be. 

In addition to being useless, trying to suppress your tension or grief can actually be detrimental. Because acceptance enables people to feel less negative emotion in reaction to stressors, those who accept rather than evaluate their mental experiences may have better psychological health.

Start up a conversation with an uplifting idea

Words have a significant impact on how you feel as well as how other people see you. “One of the main ways we communicate stress is verbally. Therefore, opening a conversation with something encouraging helps create a more upbeat atmosphere.” When someone at work asks you how you are, for instance, consider responding with something humorous like, “I just had the nicest turkey and avocado sandwich for lunch. Instead of replying, “I’m so stressed and busy,” ask how your day is going. This will inevitably move the conversation—and your thoughts—to a happier place.


Psych Times Staff

At Psych Times, we strive to help increase the awareness of mental health, to reduce the stigma of mental illness, and to provide our readers with high-quality content to help them cope with the stresses of everyday life.

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